Louise Thompson reveals she has undergone an operations amid battle with Asherman’s Syndrome


Louise Thompson reveals she has undergone an operation as she details her battle with Asherman’s Syndrome – months after near-death experience giving birth to son Leo

Louise Thompson has revealed she has undergone a ‘small operation’ amid her gruelling battle with Asherman’s Syndrome.

The former Made In Chelsea star, 32, who spent a month in intensive care after welcoming son Leo-Hunter Libbey, 14 months, last year took to Instagram to reveal she hope the procedure would help her ‘feel like her old self again’.

Asherman’s Syndrome is a condition where scar tissue form inside your uterus. The scar tissue can build up, decreasing the amount of open space making some women infertile. 

Operation: Louise Thompson, 32,  has revealed she has undergone a ‘small op’ amid her gruelling battle with Asherman’s syndrome

Louise, who suffered PTSD following the traumatic birth, shared a snap in a hospital gown as well as after the procedure where she enjoyed an alfresco meal.

In the length post she penned:  ‘Thank for all your tremendously kind messages’.

‘Just a small op to try and get rid of all the scar tissue from my Asherman’s syndrome so I can hopefully start to have a normal P and feel like my old self again’.

Revelation: The former Made In Chelsea star, who spent a month in intensive care after welcoming son Leo-Hunter Libbey, 14 months, with boyfriend Ryan last year, took to Instagram to reveal she hope the procedure would help her 'feel like her old self again'

Revelation: The former Made In Chelsea star, who spent a month in intensive care after welcoming son Leo-Hunter Libbey, 14 months, with boyfriend Ryan last year, took to Instagram to reveal she hope the procedure would help her ‘feel like her old self again’

‘By most people’s standards probably not such a big deal. By my standards, anything medical is a big deal. And anything that risks bleeding makes me feel sick as a dog’.

‘Apparently on the scale of mild to severe – it’s looking moderate to severe, so I might have to go back in 6 months time to repeat the procedure and remove any further adhesions’.

She continued: ‘Not going to lie the thoughts that ran through my head as I lay on the table getting the General Anaesthetic before being wheeled through the doors into the operating theatre were not fun’. 

Post op: Louise, who suffered PTSD following the traumatic birth, shared a snap in a hospital gown as well as after the procedure where she enjoyed an alfresco meal

Post op: Louise, who suffered PTSD following the traumatic birth, shared a snap in a hospital gown as well as after the procedure where she enjoyed an alfresco meal

‘I was really worried that I wouldn’t wake up. Or that I would wake up with tubes rammed down my throat… Or blind… or with brain damage. The list goes on’.

‘My body sometimes does strange things when I’m in a hospital environment. I get really really cold and I go rigid and can’t stop trembling, like I’m having a seizure or something’.

Writing:  My body feels full of adrenaline, like I’m going into battle. I actually quite like this feeling, it’s better than dissociating’.

‘I guess the problem is, my rational brain switches off when I feel like I’m in danger’.

Post: In the length post she penned: 'Thank for all your tremendously kind messages'

Post: In the length post she penned: ‘Thank for all your tremendously kind messages’

‘Because I was so unlucky before my brain questions why I should ever feel safe? If something bad happened before, why won’t it happen again?’

Luckily the team were incredible, with wonderful bedside manner which makes all the difference.

*for anyone wondering what Asherman’s syndrome is – it’s a uterine condition that occurs when scar tissue (adhesions) form inside the uterus and/or the cervix. 

Mum and dad: She welcomed the bundle of joy with boyfriend Ryan Libbey last year

Mum and dad: She welcomed the bundle of joy with boyfriend Ryan Libbey last year 

When it’s severe the front and back walls of the uterus can fuse together leaving no space for a lining.

It’s likely that I got it as a result of surgical scraping or cleaning of tissue from the uterine wall in previous operations.

A delay in diagnosis can mean that treatment is more difficult as the adhesions and scar tissue that are typical of Asherman’s syndrome become thicker and more extensive over time.

What are the causes of Asherman’s syndrome? 

Asherman’s syndrome can affect the uterus of any woman who has conceived. There are no genetic or hereditary factors.

The uterus is lined by the endometrium which has two layers. The top layer is shed during menstruation, while the basal layer is needed to regenerate it. 

Trauma to this basal layer, usually after a D&C (dilation and curettage, performed to remove placental remains after an elective abortion, a missed or incomplete miscarriage or birth) can trigger the normal wound-healing process. The damaged areas can fuse together, leading to scars or adhesions.

The scarring, which may be mild to severe, is not a result of an aggressive D&C but rather the body’s own reaction to the procedure. 

It may in turn mean that the endometrium fails to respond to pregnancy hormones and can lead to infertility or repeated miscarriages, as well as high-risk pregnancies. 

Sufferers may have amenorrhea (no menstruation) or pain on menstruation, indicating the cervix is blocked by adhesions.

In many cases, but not all, fertility can be restored by removing the adhesions.

Pregnancy-related D&Cs account for 90 per cent of Asherman’s cases. A drug-based alternative to D&C is just as effective in 95 per cent of women. But the remaining five per cent will then need a D&C, increasing their risk of developing Asherman’s syndrome.

 

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